Tag: diabetes

Goji Berries Go Great In Chef V’s Easy Trail Mix Recipe

Chef V Goji berry recipes

Goji berries are one of my favorite fruits. The tart-tasting, bright-red berries are native to Asia. They’re loaded with antioxidants and are clinically-proven to have several incredible health benefits. I feature them in my snack recipe for Easy Trail Mix….

Goji berries have been have been used in China and other Southeast Asian countries for more than 2,000 years. Both as a traditional medicinal herb and as food. But it’s only been about a decade since goji berries have caught on in the US. Especially in the yoga and natural health community. Yes, it’s true that some consider goji berries trendy, not to mention expensive.

But if you have the budget to treat yourself to goji berries, I strongly believe they are worth the money. (A bag of them costs about $10-$12 at a natural food market.) That’s because the health benefits of goji berries are impressive.

If you’re interested in learning about goji berry health benefits, keep reading. But if you’re only here for my Easy Trail Mix recipe, which is featured in my book, Making Cleansing Easier, I’ll indulge you.

Before I share the recipe, allow me to briefly share my inspiration for creating the recipe….

Making Your Own Healthy Snacks

One of the things I love about living in San Diego (besides the climate) is that not only am I within striking distance of the beach, but beautiful hiking trails as well. And when I go for a hike, I like to bring healthy snacks with me. And what better snack to bring on a long steep hike than trail mix….

Sure, I could go to the market and buy a bag of trail mix. But no thanks, I don’t want a bag that’s half filled with raisins. No offense, raisins, a handful of you is ok. But no more than that. This is why I like making my own healthy snacks. In this way, I control the ingredients and the flavor.

That being said, let me introduce to you my recipe for Easy Trail Mix. And make sure to stay tuned after the recipe to learn about the all-star ingredient, goji berries….

CHEF V’S EASY TRAIL MIX

My Tip:

Try different ingredients to create some fun mixes. I generally use one or two raw nuts, one seed, and one dried fruit. Some ideas for nuts: almonds, walnuts, pistachios, cashews, pecans, or macadamia nuts. For dried fruit, always choose unsweetened and unsulfured fruits. My favorites include pineapple, apple, mango, and blueberries. And, of course, goji berries.

Ingredients:

1 cup raw almonds

1 cup raw walnuts

¼ cup unsweetened dried Goji berries

¼ cup raw sunflower seeds, sprouted if available

Directions:

Combine all the ingredients in a resealable bag or a bowl. I keep a bag in my car and a bowl handy in the house for easy and healthy munching wherever I am.

Goji Berries Health Benefits

I’m no expert in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) . But I do find it fascinating. How did those ancient sages come up with the concepts of acupuncture and meridians? And how did they figure out how individual herbs affect specific organ systems? It’s mind-boggling. According to TCM, goji berries (Gou Qi Zi in Chinese) nourishes and tonifies the liver, kidneys and lungs. It also improves life essence (a concept in TCM called “Jing”) and enhances vision. Another health benefit of goji berries from a Chinese medicine point of view, they help balance yin and yang energies.

But goji berries also have the backing of modern research studies. And some of this research confirms what Chinese herbalists have known for over 2,000 years. Specifically, that goji berries help fight premature aging.  

Also known as wolfberry, goji berries, according to this research, show antitumor activity against various types of cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, they help normalize blood sugar levels and encourage insulin sensitivity. That’s great news if you have type 2 diabetes. The more sensitive to insulin you are, the less of it you need. Goji berries, says the research, increases glucose metabolism. And it turns out goji berries also benefit those with type 1 diabetes. That’s because the promote insulin secretion. In addition, they help make the cells in the pancreas that release insulin (beta cells).  

It also turns out that the ancient Chinese knew what they were talking about when it comes to goji berries benefitting the eyes. Research shows they protect cells in the retina against glaucoma.

Goji Berries: More Health Benefits

The compounds in goji berries also protect the liver. They do this by helping the liver detox, even from exposure to toxic chemicals. They also help reduce toxicity caused by radiation or chemotherapy.

And although promising research studies using mice doesn’t mean the benefits will occur in humans, it’s encouraging to see that goji berries may help prevent neurological diseases. The compounds in them lessen the symptoms of mice with Alzheimer's disease. Goji berries also help improve memory and cognitive abilities.

Here’s another goji berry health benefit I especially want my husband, Brandon (who helps me run ChefV.com), to pay attention to: better sperm health. You see, I may want kids one day. And it turns out that goji berries are beneficial to male reproduction. They increase the quality, quantity, and motility of sperm. The research also states that goji berries improve sexual performance. (Not that you need to eat goji berries for this reason, hubby! [wink]) And finally, in the bedroom department, goji berries help protecting Brandon’s own precious berries against what researchers call, “toxic insults,” whatever those might be. (Perhaps radiation from having your laptop on your crotch?)

Goji Berries: Worth the Price!

While it’s true that goji berries seem to some like an elitist superfood, as you can see the health benefits are tremendous. The berries also help fight body fat accumulation, protect the heart, and fight viruses and inflammation.

Sure, other fruits might be cheaper and offer antioxidant protection against disease and aging. But few fruits offer all of these impressive health benefits. Plus, goji berries are high in fiber, iron, calcium, and vitamins A & C. But don’t go overboard with them. Just eat a handful. Goji berries contain lots of fruit sugar.

Is It Safe For People With Type 1 Diabetes To Do A Cleanse?

Diabetes and cleanse

Yes–If  You Have Support From “The Happy Pancreas”

For those with diabetes, having to constantly monitor blood sugar can be overwhelming. For people with no blood sugar issues, doing a cleanse is a great way to get rid of toxins that cause water weight retention. But are cleanses safe for those with diabetes? If you do one under the guidance of “The Happy Pancreas”, the answer is a resounding yes!

When I launched Chef V several years ago, my intention was to introduce an easy (and great-tasting) way for people to get their daily dose of nutrient-dense, disease-preventing veggies.

But I’ll admit, even as a certified nutritional therapist, I didn’t give much thought about the impact Chef V products would have on the 1.25 million people in this country that are living with type 1 diabetes.

After all, it’s easy to overlook Type 1 diabetes. In comparison to the 30-plus million people with type 2 diabetes, type 1 accounts for only 5% or so of this blood sugar disease.

If you are one of those with type 1 diabetes, I can only imagine how challenging it is managing this potentially-deadly condition. Having to constantly monitor your blood sugar levels is enough of a burden.

However, what if your belly is bloated, your skin isn’t radiant and healthy-looking and your energy is low—and you have type 1 diabetes? These problems affect most people. But the physical and emotional effects are magnified if you have to prick yourself with insulin everyday.

Those without diabetes can easily do a cleanse to reboot metabolism. But what about those living with type 1 diabetes? Is there a way to safely and effectively do a cleanse?

diabetes syringe and salad

Thanks to Whitney Lewis, a Chef V customer living with type 1 (make that, thriving!), it’s never been easier. To date, Whitney has successfully finished five Chef V cleanses. Inspired to make life easier for those with type 1, and to share her challenges living with the disease, Whitney created the blog, Happy Pancreas.

About 2 ½ years ago, Whitney was invited by a friend to do a cleanse. Along with her friend’s support, she was able to complete it. Whitney realize how important accountability and community were for people with type 1 diabetes.

I’ll tell you more about Whitney’s program in just a bit. But first, a little 411 is in order…

diabetes patch

What is Type 1 Diabetes?

Approximately 5 years ago, Whitney was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. If you’re not familiar with the disease or the difference between it, I’ll briefly fill you in.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. That means the body attacks itself. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system response leads to the inability of the cells in the pancreas to create the blood-sugar-controlling hormone, insulin.

Without insulin, sugar in the blood cannot reach the cells. Cells need glucose (sugar) to function properly. Without enough glucose, cells die. And when blood sugar levels fall too low, the function of the  brain, which depends almost entirely on glucose as a source of energy, can go haywire, causing, dizziness, confusion, and even coma and death in severe cases.

By comparison, type 2 diabetes, is mostly a lifestyle disease, resulting from eating too many foods rich in added sugars or refined carbohydrates (although genetics can also be a contributing factor in developing the disease.) Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 is not an autoimmune disease.

Some people think the cause of type 1 diabetes is sugar. However, the true cause is mostly genetic.

What’s It Like Living with Type 1 Diabetes? 

As Whitney says, this disease is a lot.

You have to constantly manage your blood sugar and be aware of everything you put in your body.

Every day, you have to manually inject insulin to keep blood sugar levels in a normal range—and to stay alive.

Type 1 diabetes is an incurable disease. But Whitney manages it with a tongue-in-cheek response, or more accurately, a hand-in-pocket solution: she carries a pancreas-shaped purse that contains her syringes and insulin.

lounging with Green Drink

Those with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood sugar levels before meals and workouts, and other situations whenever the body would normally create insulin.

“Lots and lots of pokes every day … it’s not easy,” says Whitney, adding, “It can be extremely daunting…. With type 1 diabetes you must always be on and aware of your ever-changing (and sometimes dangerous) blood sugar levels. It throws a wrench in almost every ordinary situation and can often leave you feeling hindered and limited in trying things ‘normal’ people try.”

But Whitney’s type 1 diagnosis about 5 ½ years ago has led to a silver lining. Living with type 1 diabetes has led to a “passion and love for helping people with this autoimmune condition.”

Why Chef V Organic Green Drink Is Best For Type 1 Diabetes

Chef V Organic Green Drink, the foundation of the Cleanse/Detox programs I created, offer many nutritional benefits. As Whitney points out on her blog on type 1 diabetes, the biggest benefit is from the fiber in the Organic Green Drink. Whereas blended juices contain virtually no fiber, thus causing the juice to be absorbed into your bloodstream very quickly, leading to mood swings, energy loss, and extra stress when managing your diabetes, Chef V’s Organic Green Drink contains hardly any sugar. And super important, it contains the pulp (fiber) that’s necessary to keep blood sugar levels steady.

I’m both humbled and grateful that Whitney has chosen the Chef V Cleanse to help those living with type 1 diabetes reach their health goals.

Chef V

2 Easy hacks for Lowering Blood Sugar levels

walking for diabetes

Living with diabetes isn’t a life sentence. In fact, it is possible to reverse diabetes. Sure, it’s going to take a lifestyle adjustment, including getting regular exercise and diet modification. But with these 2 easy hacks, you’ll be on your way to managing your diabetes.

Hack #1: take a walk

A simple way to have your blood sugar return to normal after a meal is by taking a walk. It doesn’t have to be a super vigorous hike, but getting enough exercise is important for managing diabetes and this is especially true if you’re sedentary for most of the day.

Even more important than the advice to exercise is learning when to exercise. And if you only have time (or the motivation) to move your body once per day, research strongly suggests you should do it after dinner.

Most people eat their heaviest meal at night. And the biggest spike in blood sugar occurs after eating a large meal, especially if it contains lots of carbohydrates that have the potential of converting into sugar. (Think: pasta, bread, rice and other starchy carbohydrates.) Walking after a heavy meal is a proven way to improve blood sugar levels.

Consider this study from New Zealand. Two groups of people, most of whom had type II diabetes for 10 years, were compared. One group walked for 30 minutes a day for two weeks. The other group went for a 10-minute walk after each main meal. The results: blood sugar levels were significantly lower when participants walked after meals compared with the group who only went for one walk a day.

Meanwhile a different study compares exercising before a meal and after. The group with the lower blood sugar levels exercised after their meal, not before. This supports the first study that it’s vital to move around after eating a meal.

Hacks 1.1 and 1.2: When weather is bad, Use an App and watch lots of TV (while moving)

Hack 1.1 within this hack is to either set a timer or use an app to alert you to move and remind you to be more active. It’s important to emphasize that you just need to go for a walk. Not a power walk. And not a steep hike, or a jog. Or, God forbid, wind sprints. Just a casual stroll after each meal is all it takes to lower blood sugar. The problem with this solution of post-meal walks is that many of us are so busy that we often forget to go for a walk. The gravitational pull of the couch is so strong when you’re tired at the end of a long day. All you want to do is binge watch your favorite Netflix show.

Hack 1.2 is to beat the weather with a treadmill, or just walking in place.  Weather can prevent some people from walking after a meal. If it’s -30 degrees outside, the last thing you’re going to want to do is go outside. The easy hack: walk in place while you watch TV.  If you can make it a habit to just walk in place (or if you have a treadmill at home) while you watch TV, before you know it, you’ll have walked 30 minutes or even an hour. And you don’t need to be drenched in sweat to reap the benefits of a post-meal walk.

To reiterate, just move. Walk at a comfortable but not laborious clip. That’s all it takes to normalize your blood sugar level after a meal.

(Suggested reading: “Blunting post-meal glucose surges in people with diabetes”) 

medical cannabis

Hack #2: Eat Healthy Cereal – Easy Way to Lower Blood Sugar

Breakfast cereal is one of the most popular meals in the morning for people who need to quickly wolf something down before school or work. But most breakfast cereals are loaded with heavily processed grains (which are carbohydrates.) In fact, using as an example, Kellogg’s Raisin Bran, just one cup (and who eats just one cup?) contains almost 50 grams of carbs. That means if you pour yourself a big bowl of cereal in the morning, and add some banana slices you’ll start your day with over 100 grams of carbs. And that’s not even counting the sugar from milk.

It’s no wonder that many people by 10:30 or 11 in the morning need their third cup of coffee just to stay awake and be productive until it’s time for lunch. That’s because high carb breakfasts such as cereal and bagels, toast, muffins, danishes, donuts, etc. contain too many quick-burning carbs. These carbs quickly spike blood sugar levels. And what quickly goes up must come crashing back to Earth. It’s these blood-sugar fluctuations that produce mood swings, not to mention chronic metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes.

So what’s a cereal lover to do? You can’t paint stripes on a donkey and call it a tiger. Telling someone to stop eating cereal who has been eating it for decades may not be the best coaching advice. Instead, try Chef V’s Recipe for Healthy Cereal.

We’ll be offering more easy blood sugar lowering hacks and recipes in the future. But for now, enjoy a bowl of this yummy low-carb cereal. The recipe comes from the cookbook, Making Cleansing Easier by Chef V, aka Veronica Wheat Kress, the first entrepreneur to offer nationwide overnight delivery of 100% certified organic, cold-blended Green Drinks.

Healthy Cereal Recipe With Chef V’s Raw Almond Milk

  • 3 cups raw almonds
  • ¼ cup fresh blueberries
  • 3 cups filtered water
  • ½ cup Chef V’s Raw Almond Milk
  • or coconut milk
  • ¼ cup crushed raw almonds
  • ¼ cup crushed raw walnuts
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened shredded coconut

To make the almond milk, process 3 cups of raw almonds and 3 cups filtered water in a Vitamix until liquefied. Strain through a cheesecloth into a mason jar and seal. Will keep for up to 3-5 days refrigerated.

To make the cereal, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and serve.

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load: Know the Facts!

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load: Know the Facts!

Glycemic index and Glycemic load: Know the Facts.  Understanding will help you choose the healthiest foods and avoid  the traps of false advertising. Chef V explains. Vital information for people with diabetes and those who want to avoid getting it.

image with permission diabetesmealplans.com

Just the facts/bottom line:
Pick foods with a Glycemic index under 60
and a Glycemic Load under 15.
Look for lower numbers.

I feel sorry for carrots. Watermelon, too. You see, these two healthy foods are often vilified by health extremists for supposedly having too much sugar. They argue that carrots and watermelon rank very high on the glycemic index.

Before I come to the defense of carrots and watermelon, let me explain what the glycemic index is….

What is it and can it help manage diabetes

Put simply, the glycemic index is a ranking of foods (and drinks) with carbs. A score of 70 or greater is high. And a score of 56-69 is medium on the glycemic index (GI). A low score is 55 or less. The higher the number, the more quickly the carbs in foods converts into sugar in your blood. Veggies like broccoli have a score of 0. Watermelon ranks 72. And raw carrots is almost at the top of the charts: 93. Considering that a croissant ranks 95, does that mean having a carrot is almost as bad as indulging in a French pastry?

No, it doesn’t. While the GI can be a useful tool for managing diabetes, it does have some shortcomings.

top 5 ways to use Green Drink #1

But it has Limitations

The Glycemic Index measures the potential effects of carbs on your blood sugar within a two-hour window after eating. What’s the problem with this? Well, if you have diabetes, eating carb-rich foods can affect your blood sugar levels for up to four hours.

Second, the GI often does not take into account the precise amount of carbs eaten at one time. When the GI was established in the early 1980s, the researchers created it to analyze the effect of carbs on blood sugar (glucose) like a bell curve. In other words, it’s not scientifically very accurate. And not just because it’s only a two-hour window. But also, because it measures the food following a 12-hour fast. Moreover, the amount of carbs that it tests to rank it on the GI scale is approximately 50 grams. Thus, depending on the food, even though it might rank high on the GI, it doesn’t mean it’s going to spike your blood sugar.

A more accurate measure to use is the glycemic load. The glycemic load takes into account how much carbohydrate is eaten in one sitting. That’s the biggest and most important difference between glycemic index and glycemic load.

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Values for Selected Foods

FoodGI
(Glucose=100)
Serving SizeCarbohydrate* per Serving (g)GL per Serving
Russet potato, baked
111
1 medium
30
33
Potato, white, boiled (average)
82
1 medium
30
25
Puffed rice cakes
82
3 cakes
21
17
Cornflakes
79
1 cup
26
20
Jelly beans
78
1 oz
28
22
Doughnut
76
1 medium
23
17
Watermelon
76
1 cup
11
8
Soda crackers
74
4 crackers
17
12
Bread, white-wheat flour
71
1 large slice
14
10
Pancake
67
6″ diameter
58
39
Rice, white, boiled
66
1 cup
53
35
Table sugar (sucrose)
63
2 tsp
10
6
Dates, dried
62
2 oz
40
25
Spaghetti, white, boiled (20 min)
58
1 cup
44
25
Honey, pure
58
1 Tbsp
17
10
Pineapple, raw
58
½ cup
19
11
Banana, raw
55
1 cup
24
13
Maple syrup, Canadian
54
1 Tbsp
14
7
Parsnips, peeled, boiled
52
½ cup
10
5
Rice, brown, boiled
50
1 cup
42
20
Spaghetti, white, boiled (average)
46
1 cup
44
20
Whole-grain pumpernickel bread
46
1 large slice
12
5
All-Bran™ cereal
45
1 cup
21
10
Spaghetti, whole-meal, boiled
32
1 cup
37
14
Orange, raw
42
1 medium
11
5
Apple, raw
39
1 medium
15
6
Pear, raw
38
1 medium
11
4
Skim milk
33
8 fl oz
13
4
Carrots, boiled
33
½ cup
4
1
Lentils, dried, boiled
29
1 cup
24
7
Kidney beans, dried, boiled
28
1 cup
29
8
Pearled barley, boiled
28
1 cup
38
11
Cashews
25
1 oz
9
2
Peanuts
18
1 oz
6
1
*Amount of available carbohydrates in a food serving that excludes indigestible carbohydrates, i.e., dietary fiber.

Why the glycemic load is more accurate

You can consider the glycemic load as the glycemic index 2.0. And the three tiers of the glycemic load (GL) you should be familiar with are 0-10, which is low; 11-19, medium; and 20 and above which is high.

Unlike the glycemic index, If a certain food ranks high on the glycemic load scale, it’s safe to assume it’s not good for diabetes management. The GL is figured out by taking the amount of grams of carbs in a food and multiplying that by the food’s glycemic index score. Then, you take that number and divide by 100.

But you know what, don’t worry about potentially confusing diet math right now. What’s more important is understanding this biggest difference between glycemic index vs load. And let’s use as an example the one veggie and fruit that often get a bum rap. I’m referring of course to carrots and watermelon.

Remember, watermelon ranks high on the GI at 72. But it’s glycemic load is low, only 7. And carrots, despite having a potentially blood-sugar spiking score in the 90s only has a GL score of 1. Yes, that’s not a typo. In other words, according to the glycemic load score, carrots have little risk of converting into blood sugar.

How can this disparity exist? Isn’t it really confusing if you’re trying to manage your diabetes? The answer to the second question: yes, totally. I feel your pain. When I was studying for my certified nutrition therapy coursework, I was confused by the difference between the glycemic index vs load. But, again, the simple difference between the two is that the glycemic index does not take into account serving sizes. That means if you only eat one large raw carrot, that carrot may have a negligible effect on your blood sugar.

Carrots: Glycemic Index VS Load: Why the glycemic load is more accurate

More reasons why the index isn’t the holy grail of diabetes management

The reason why the glycemic load of watermelon and carrots is so low is that both of them contain no fat and protein. Foods that contain fat and protein have a lower glycemic index. Because theoretically, protein and especially dietary fat can reduce the effect of carbs converting into sugar. This is why peanut butter M&Ms have a relatively-low score on the GI: 33. Does that mean you should eat more peanut butter M&Ms and less watermelon and carrots? Of course not. This exemplifies how the glycemic index isn’t always a great tool for managing diabetes.

In addition, the glycemic index as well as the glycemic load do not take into account the cooking methods of a particular food. For example, did you know that al dente pasta has a lower glycemic load than soft, mushy noodles? That’s because your digestive system has to work harder to break down al dente pasta. Also, the indexes don’t account for how ripe or raw a food is. Take bananas, for example. Green-tipped bananas (eaten with nothing else) will cause less of an insulin response than a really ripe banana.

That’s why yet another index, the insulin index, might be an even better determinant of the effect of a food on your blood sugar level. According to the insulin index, pasta really isn’t that bad for you. That’s not to say if you have diabetes and you’re doing your best to reverse it, you should eat it. But one small serving of it, especially if you drizzle it with olive oil and have a lean, small portion of meat on the side, is relatively low on the insulin index. How can this be? Well, it takes longer than white bread and other starchy carbs for pasta to break down into sugar.

Insulin Index of Common Foods

Index VS Load: conclusion

As always, the emphasis on eating should focus on foods rich in fiber (which also slows down the conversion of carbs into glucose), especially leafy green and cruciferous veggies (such as those in Certified Organic Green Drinks). And if you’re trying to normalize your blood sugar levels, your meals should satisfy you enough so that you can go several hours in between meals without feeling hungry. That means you need enough dietary fat and protein to balance out the carbs.

And this is a topic for another blog post about diabetes management, but in general, you can safely eat a moderate amount of fruit without worrying about it skyrocketing your blood sugar. Try to eat a handful of nuts along with the fruit. The protein and fat in the nuts will further slow down any potential for the fruit sugar converting to sugar in your blood.

But also keep in mind that if you eat a huge portion of meat, some of that protein can be converted into blood sugar. This is another limitation of the glycemic index. According to the index, meat ranks 0. That’s because meat doesn’t have any carbs.

Another reason the glycemic index isn’t a panacea for weight loss and diabetes management is two completely different foods can rank the same on the GI. But one of those foods can produce an insulin response that skyrockets your blood sugar level whereas the other food can have a much lesser insulin response.

Cleansing with Diabetes – Whitney’s Story

leaky gut

Whitney generously shares her experience with green drink as she manages her Type 1 diabetes. (@happypancreas) story amidst her journey with Type 1 Diabetes – an incurable disease that affects the body’s immune system response, leading to the inability of the cells in the pancreas to create the blood-sugar-controlling hormone, insulin.

While cleansing with diabetes can be limiting, Whitney has proved otherwise in her experience with Chef V. Her website is Happypancreas.com.

your microbiome - bacteria

Living with Type 1 Diabetes

When living with a non-insulin producing (i.e. broken) pancreas, caution is brought into almost every “no caution needed,” average situation.

Going for a light jog? Running into Trader Joe’s for your favorite snack? Ordering your favorite smoothie?–these seem like random, simple, mindless activities. . . but the reality is that simple jog or healthy smoothie could make waves in your entire day.

With Type 1 diabetes you must always be “on” and aware of your ever-changing (sometimes dangerous) blood sugar levels. It throws a wrench in almost every ordinary situation and can often leave you feeling hindered and limited in trying things “normal” people try especially cleanses due to their (typical) high sugar content.

Attempting to offset the sharp rise in blood sugars from a juice can be nearly impossible with Type 1 so staying clear of them is often encouraged diabetic educators and endocrinologists — and rightfully so.

leaky gut

So when one of my best friends introduced me to ChefV and mentioned the low sugar content, I was skeptic! She wanted me to do try the 3 Day Cleanse, but I was nervous. It seemed impossible for a juice to be low sugar.

But after thorough research, I found that Chev’s blended green juice had less than 6 grams per serving, so I was ready to give this a try and see what happened with my blood sugars.

I knew it would require mindfulness and hard work, since it was new and uncharted territory for me – but I was ready.

Flash forward five years later, and I have successfully cleansed 5 times with Chef V’s three day juice cleanse and it has changed not just how I feel physically, but also my entire perspective on cleansing.

A cleanse doesn’t have to be blood sugar bomb – full of mainly juiced fruits and veggies.

Chef V shows that vegetables should be the star ingredients in all your juice blends. Blending: Black Kale, Green Kale, Collard Greens, Green Leaf Lettuce, Curly Parsley, Green Chard, Dandelion Greens, and using a touch of apple to complement and enhance the flavor of the veggies.

This magical blend is how cleansing is 100% possible with diabetes. All the benefits… minus the sugar trap!

Diabetes: Whitney’s Chef V Experience

leaky gut

Can the answer to managing diabetes be as simple as chugging a 16 oz. glass of juice every day? Not if it’s orange juice, or other fruit juice. But managing diabetes with blended veggie juice like Chef V’s Organic Green Drink is an easy, sustainable solution.

Happy Pancreas, Happy Life

Whitney Louis is one customer living with diabetes who credits Green Drink with helping manage her A1C levels. Take a look at Whitney’s Instagram profile. (Her tongue-in-cheek profile name: HappyPancreas).

“Diabetes makes it super hard to follow cleanses because many out there are juice based (i.e. 100% sugar). This requires a lot of [monitoring], and increases the variability in our blood sugar numbers,” says Whitney.

“The foundation of Chef V is BLENDED super greens so the fiber stays put and blood sugars keep stable … [and] if you are seeking the ultimate reset: minimizing cravings, removing built up toxins, calming inflammation, increasing your insulin sensitivity, AND shedding a few stubborn lbs…. this is a great starting point!” adds Whitney.

Now it might sound like Whitney is a paid shill for Chef V. She’s not. Whitney is just sharing with her followers what she believes is one easy [and tasty] solution for managing diabetes. She says on her blog:

p.s. not sponsored, just showing the love when well deserved! they ship to your door and available across the u.s.

leaky gut

© 2021 Chef V, LLC.